PhD

In fall of 2014, I started my PhD in Technology degree in the College of Technology at Purdue University. The college has since been renamed to the Purdue Polytechnic Institute. I am still primarily based at the Department of Aviation Technology, where I work with my advisor, Mary E. Johnson, on projects related to sustainability aspects of the aviation industry. I expect to graduate in spring of 2017, if everything goes according to plan.

They say "publish or perish" and since 2014, I have been working on a number of publications (and of course conference presentations), so here are some for you to read:


Sustainability Reporting Practices of Group III U.S. Air Carriers

Published in the International Journal of Aviation, Aeronautics and Aerospace

Abstract:

Once a side note, sustainability reporting has become an important issue for companies and airlines globally and in the U.S. This exploratory study examined the sustainability reporting practices of U.S. passenger and cargo air carriers with total revenues exceeding $1 billion classified as Group III air carriers by the U.S Department of Transportation. The results showed that 53% of Group III air carriers published sustainability reports. Out of these 53%, all except one referenced the Global Reporting framework in their sustainability reports. Forty percent or 6 out of 15 carriers participated in at least one Carbon Disclosure Project questionnaire. Based on these results, it appears that the U.S. airline industry has considerable room for improvement in terms of the percentage of companies involved in sustainability reporting.

Available from http://commons.erau.edu/ijaaa/

Suggested APA citation:

Rudari, L., & Johnson, M. E. (2015). Sustainability Reporting Practices of Group III U.S. Air Carriers. International Journal of Aviation, Aeronautics, and Aerospace, 2(2). Retrieved from http://commons.erau.edu/ijaaa/vol2/iss2/5


The Sustainability of FAR Part 117: Flight and Duty Limitation and Rest Requirements for Flight Crewmembers

Published in the Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting September 2014 vol. 58 no. 1 1969-1973

Abstract:

The Federal Aviation Administration addressed fatigue risk for Part 121 pilots in 14 C.F.R. Part 117, which came into effect in January 2014. Fatigue jeopardizes safety in the sense that it increases the likelihood for pilot error which could potentially lead to an accident. The new regulations recognize for the first time risks to safety such as changes to natural circadian rhythms and “jetlag”. A sustainability analysis was conducted for the new rest requirements which required a systematic approach to address the four key components of sustainability: economic, social, environmental, and organizational. This analysis primarily focuses on organizational aspects of 14 C.F.R. Part 117 sustainability. This study analyzed responses from 53 self-identified non-pilots (i.e. management, maintenance, safety personnel) to determine their perceptions of the new rest requirements for pilots in the industry. The responses indicate that there is a slight increase in perceived overall safety; however, the respondents reported that this new regulation would have a slightly negative effect on the organizational operations.

Available from http://pro.sagepub.com/

Suggested APA citation:

Rudari, L., Sperlak, L. A., Geske, R. C., Jones, G. E., & Johnson, M. E. (2014, September). The Sustainability of FAR Part 117 Flight and Duty Limitation and Rest Requirements for Flight Crewmembers. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting September 2014, 58(1), 1969-1973. doi:10.1177/1541931214581411